Tips on Leading from Wonder Woman

Written by guest contributor, Laura Liswood. Liswood is the Secretary General of the Council of Women World Leaders in Washington, D.C. Liswood received the Global ATHENA Leadership Award in 1998.


She apologizes only once in the entire movie and that is when she accidentally uses her super power of crossing her arms and knocks her aunt Captain Antiope (played by the powerful, graceful Robin Wright, the best warrior on Themysciras). Wonder Woman has a sponsor and mentor in Captain Antiope and a role model of a battle scarred, majestic and fearless leader to emulate.

How does Wonder Woman, (Gal Gadot) learn to be a leader? Like all leaders do. Practice, feedback, trial, practice, feedback, and more difficult trials are the building blocks of her leadership foundation. She gets hurt, her pride is wounded and she is exhorted to dig deeper and become more confident. She is told she is better than that and she has the potential to become great. Wonder Woman, even as a young girl knows what she wants to has a passion and determination to achieve and she goes about learning the skills needed to succeed.

As the movie proceeds she shows no sign of stereotype threat. (Stereotype threat describes the experience of “being at risk of confirming, as self-characteristic, a negative stereotype of one’s group” his social-psychological phenomenon has been shown to significantly decrease the performance of persons who belong to negatively stereotyped groups). She has never been taught, heard, watched a TV show, been objectified or been trolled on social media where the message was that women are inferior to men or cannot perform as well as men. Her world is not divided into gendered roles; her world is divided into roles needed by the society she lives in.

She is a full equal human being and her life has been equally full of strong determined clear spoken women, who are senators, decision makers and a queen (her mother) who rules with wisdom and concern. She doesn’t spend her life obsessed by the need to look beautiful for the other or to sublimate herself to attract a man. (Later we find that she knows that men are needed for procreation but not necessarily for pleasure). She does fall in love with a man but on her terms.

On the battlefield when she confronts those who are trying to eliminate her being, Wonder woman literally and figuratively deflects bullets being shot at her. She can withstand the fuselage as many women leaders learn early on to deflect the critics, skeptics, the name calling, categorizing, over scrutiny that come their way when they seek or accept power and its roles. In fact, she holds her power in plain sight when she slips the magic sword into the back of her dress; it is ignored by the men in the room.